NSCC W. K. Morrison Special Collection

This Collection was donated to NSCC COGS by Walter Morrison, Cartographer Emeritus of COGS who was interested in antique maps as an illustration of the evolution of map making technology. It is a mixed media print collection of historical maps, atlases, periodicals and books that is focused on the early mapping of Atlantic Canada and specifically Nova Scotia. There are over 2000 items in the print collection; we invite you to follow us as we grow our digital collection.


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A Plan of Fort St. Philip and its Environs, with the French Emcampments, Batteries, &c.
A Plan of Fort St. Philip and its Environs, with the French Emcampments, Batteries, &c.
Detailed and decorative map of fortifications, walls, blockades, and water sources. Duke de Richelieu landed on the island and besieged the British garrison commonly known as the Fall of Minorca. Scale is 4 Furlongs or 1/2 mile. Of particular interest on this map are etchings of nine was ships off the coast. The references key complete with explanations of the fort are within the pages of the Gentleman's Quarterly specifically: Countergards, Ravelins, Lunettes, areas of attack, and places where supplies were received. The French Encampment is clearly marked., Map located just east of Spain. Map reads with North facing to the top left corner of the map. Prime Meridian is Unknown, due to lack of information on the map.
A Plan of GIBRALTAR
A Plan of GIBRALTAR
A plan of the British town and fortifications of the Rock at Gibraltar from an oblique view. The legend found in the accompanying text describes the pertinent features of the plan, and two ships of the line are rendered in the bay. Letters key A-O is explained on page 299., The scale bar is in English miles, and no graticule is present. The scale was calculated from the scale bar, and the coordinates were derived via georeferencing.
A Plan of HAVRE DE GRACE, and the Face of the adjacent Country
A Plan of HAVRE DE GRACE, and the Face of the adjacent Country
A plan of Havre de Grace (modern day Le Havre) from an oblique view showing fortifications and surrounding villages. Feathered arrows represent water flow direction, and sand banks are shown through extensive stipling. A large and bold 16 point compass rose sits prominently near the top left corner. The relief shown is extensively detailed, while the settlements are quite generalized. The Canal of Harfleur is central to the map with a large inscribed arrow indicating direction of flow. Grassland and trees are drawn to represent land cover revealing individual fields, and there are a few short descriptions of areas, including the timber words in the silt just west of Le Havre., The scale bar is in French toises, and there is no graticule; scale was calculated from the scale bar and the coordinates from georeferencing.
A Plan of PORTO BELLO
A Plan of PORTO BELLO
A plan of Porto Bello and surrounding waters, Panama displaying action from the War of Jenkins Ear. A lettered A-Z key is explained on page 191. Saltwater marshland is shown via stippling, The characteristics of individual ships can be discerned, while land defenses are more generalized., The accompanying legend can be found on page 191. No scale bar or graticule are present; coordinates and scale were derived via georeferencing.
A Plan of the BATTLE of WEISSEMFELS; between the King of Prussia on one side, & the Combined Armies of France & the Empire on the other November 5th, 1757
A Plan of the BATTLE of WEISSEMFELS; between the King of Prussia on one side, & the Combined Armies of France & the Empire on the other November 5th, 1757
A interesting copper engraved plan of the 18th century Battle of Weissenfels during the Seven Years War. Related text describing plan and battle included in the text. Plan is highly detailed. This imposed batter between Russia's General Witt. There is a large split in the plan due to the scanning procedure. The plan details garrison, artilery placement, number of squads in each cavalry, army of the Prince of Hilburyhausen, the march of the King of Prussia, and specific roadways., A legend describing the action is available on the opposite page. The scale bar is in English Miles and paces, and there is no graticule. It is only loosely georefenced at the moment until more research on the battle can be conducted as pertaining to its orientation, and to do justice to the pivotal battle.
A Plan of the CITY & FORTIFICATIONS OF LOUISBOURG, from a Survey made by Richard Gridley, Lieut. Col. of the Train of Artillery in 1745
A Plan of the CITY & FORTIFICATIONS OF LOUISBOURG, from a Survey made by Richard Gridley, Lieut. Col. of the Train of Artillery in 1745
For those familiar with the history of Louisbourg, there is some irony in the date of publication of these maps. Appearing in the May 1758 issue of Universal Magazine they highlight the 1745 seige. On May 29, 1758 the British Navy left Halifax for what would be the final battle over Louisbourg. By the time this issue reached subscribers, the battle was probably well underway., Inset: A Map of GABARUS BAY, adjoining to Louisbourg, Although Jefferys name does not appear on these maps, they are almost identical to others known to have been engraved by him both before and after this was published. The cartouches are also typical of his style.
A Plan of the Canal from the Trent to the Severn
A Plan of the Canal from the Trent to the Severn
A plan of the important canal connecting the River Trent to the River Severn, with a junction to the Birmingham system at Wolver Hampton. It is very sparse in ornamentation - this plan does not have a cartouche. Only some very light hatching illustrates some of the land's characteristics., The plan oriented with ESE on the top, and has a scale bar in English miles. The scale was calculated from the map's scale bar, and the coordinates were obtained via georeferencing. Matches up with GIS data reasonably well.
A Plan of the City & Harbour of LOUISBOURG; shewing that part of GABARUS BAY in which the English landed, also their Encampment during the Siege in 1745
A Plan of the City & Harbour of LOUISBOURG; shewing that part of GABARUS BAY in which the English landed, also their Encampment during the Siege in 1745
There is an inset map of Cape Breton Island in the top right hand corner of the map., There is one scale bar on the bottom of the main map, in English miles. The Prime meridian is unknown for the main map, due to lack of graticule and information on the map, but the key map indicated that the Prime meridian with that map is based in London. Both maps indicate North facing to the top of the map.
A Plan of the HAVANAH
A Plan of the HAVANAH
A plan of Havana and surrounding waters displaying military assets and action during presumably the War of Jenkins Ear. A letterkey A-O is explained on page 193. Of special interest is the chain stretching across the harbour from Morro Castle to the fort at La Punta. Each ship has discernible individual characteristics. Extensive hatching using multiple lengths and lineweights are used to highlight the shoreline, display relief, and represent the water upon which the ships are resting pictorially. Havana's buildings are generalized to hatched polygons., No scale bar or graticule are present; coordinates and scale were derived via georeferencing.
A Plan of the NAVIGABLE CANAL from Birmingham in the County of Warwick, to the Canal at Aldersley, near Wolverhampton in the County of Stafford; with a Collateral Cut to the Coal Mines at Wednesbury
A Plan of the NAVIGABLE CANAL from Birmingham in the County of Warwick, to the Canal at Aldersley, near Wolverhampton in the County of Stafford; with a Collateral Cut to the Coal Mines at Wednesbury
A plan of the canal between Birmingham and Wolverhampton with the collateral cut to the Wednesbury coal mines. A bare bones design; hatching and wooded areas are not shown, but small vignettes for prominent churches along the way are drawn, and what are most likely coat pits are drawn as discs containing dots in their centres., This plan differs somewhat from the available GIS data. Therefore rubbersheeting may be necessary. The scale was calculated from the map's scale bar, and the coordinates were derived via georeferencing.
A Plan of the Navigable Canal now making from the City of Chester to Middlewich, and of the Branch from A to Naintwich
A Plan of the Navigable Canal now making from the City of Chester to Middlewich, and of the Branch from A to Naintwich
The map shows planning the canal with little details., A plan of the canal from Chester to Middlewich, Cheshire, with a branch SE to Nantwich. Often these canals closely follow existing rivers, but in this instance the canal is quite independent . The plan has little in the way of ornamentation; the north arrow is identical to that of WKM-J-181 except the crosshair is only encircled once. The map is a good candidate for rubber sheeting as it does not match well within a GIS. The scale was calculated from the map's scale bar, and the coordinates were derived via georeferencing.
A Plan of the Old Navigation from Liverpool to Manchester, (in part ) & of the Duke of Bridgewaters Canal, from the Coal Mine to Manchester, & to Stratford
A Plan of the Old Navigation from Liverpool to Manchester, (in part ) & of the Duke of Bridgewaters Canal, from the Coal Mine to Manchester, & to Stratford
Plan of roads between Liverpool and Manchester. Details include canal from Coal Mine to Manchester and Stradford. Dotted lines indicate old routes traveled to towns before the canal was built., Road and canal map/ There is no scale to interpret.
A Plan of the Propos'd NAVIGABLE CANAL from the Leeds & Liverpool Canal near Eccleston in the County Palatine of Lancaster, to Kendal in Westmorland, Survey'd in 1772, by Rob't Whitworth
A Plan of the Propos'd NAVIGABLE CANAL from the Leeds & Liverpool Canal near Eccleston in the County Palatine of Lancaster, to Kendal in Westmorland, Survey'd in 1772, by Rob't Whitworth
The plan is sparse in cartographic ornamentation. It depicts schematic for the proposed hydrographic system. The lengths and rises of the locks reside in the table below centre., The lengths and rises of the locks reside in the table below centre. The map is orient with West at the top. The scale was calculated from the map's scale bar, and the coordinates were derived via georeferencing.
A Plan of the RIVER THAMES, from Boulters Lock to Mortlake in SURRY; From an Actual Survey, taken in 1770
A Plan of the RIVER THAMES, from Boulters Lock to Mortlake in SURRY; From an Actual Survey, taken in 1770
"An antique canal map entitled ""A Plan of the River Thames from Boulters Lock to Mortlake in Surrey. From an actual Survey taken in 1770."" Published in 1771 the map was later coloured by hand. The plan simply details the course of the River Thames from Boulters Lock to Mortlake., The distance in miles, furlongs, chains, feet, and inches (presuming that the numbers right of the divider do not correspond to an average depth; article does not say) from one bridge to the next along the river are tabled in the bottom left. The scale was calculated from the scale bar and the coordinates were derived via georeferencing. This plan matches reasonably well within a GIS.
A Plan of the River Tees, and of the intended NAVIGABLE CANAL from Stockton by Darlington to Winston, in the Bishoprick of Durham
A Plan of the River Tees, and of the intended NAVIGABLE CANAL from Stockton by Darlington to Winston, in the Bishoprick of Durham
In typical Whitworth style it reads more as a schematic than a map of the time, relaying necessary information without ornamentation. The specifics of each lock are within the table located to the bottom left of the map., A plan of an intended canal between Staindrop and modern day Stockton-on-Tees, both located in County Durham, England. Good candidate for rubber sheeting as hydrologic features do not match well with a GIS. The scale of the map was calculated from the scale bar, and the coordinates were derived via georeferencing.

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