NSCC W. K. Morrison Special Collection

This Collection was donated to NSCC COGS by Walter Morrison, Cartographer Emeritus of COGS who was interested in antique maps as an illustration of the evolution of map making technology. It is a mixed media print collection of historical maps, atlases, periodicals and books that is focused on the early mapping of Atlantic Canada and specifically Nova Scotia. There are over 2000 items in the print collection; we invite you to follow us as we grow our digital collection.


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An Accurate Map of the SOUTH Part of UPPER SAXONY including LUSATIA
An Accurate Map of the SOUTH Part of UPPER SAXONY including LUSATIA
A map of Upper Saxony and Lusatia located in modern day Germany and the Czech Republic. The legend in the top left corner describes political control of regions. A sweeping scroll motif cartouche is place in top center of map.The routes of the Prussians are described. The text beginning on page 367 remarks on the activities of the war and discrepancies of the map. To the left of the north arrow is the description of the double dashed line used to show the routes of the Prussian army. Relief is shown with light hachuring, and major rivers are double-lined., The map's scale bars are in both British (69 to a degree) and German (15 miles to a degree) miles, and London is used for the prime meridian.
An Accurate Map of the Seat of War in the Kingdom of Prussia as Also in Bohemia, Lusatia, Silesia, Saxony Westphalia &c. by Tho: Kitchin Geogr.
An Accurate Map of the Seat of War in the Kingdom of Prussia as Also in Bohemia, Lusatia, Silesia, Saxony Westphalia &c. by Tho: Kitchin Geogr.
A pictorial map showing most of Europe affected by the war and before the signing of the Treaty of Hubertusburg. Imperial Circles are not referred to as such, but are only given their territorial names. Border delineation is done through broken lines, and relief is shown., There are two scale bars in German and English miles, and London is used for the prime meridian; the scale was calculated from the scale bar and the coordinates from the map's graticule.
An Authentic PLAN of the RIVER ST. LAURENCE, from Sillery to the Fall of Montmorenci; with the Operations of the SIEGE of QUEBEC, under the Command of Vice-Adm'l Saunders & Major Gen'l Wolfe. 1759
An Authentic PLAN of the RIVER ST. LAURENCE, from Sillery to the Fall of Montmorenci; with the Operations of the SIEGE of QUEBEC, under the Command of Vice-Adm'l Saunders & Major Gen'l Wolfe. 1759
Drawn by an officer of the Royal Navy, this map depicts the British and French tactical positions at the time of the climatic battle on the Plains of Abraham, September 13, 1759. Two insets on the map depicting view of the engagement from Quebec City and along the St. Laurence. That engagement led to a French defeat and the deaths of both commanders, Montcalm and Wolfe; the city surrendered five days later. Wolfe’s overwhelming advantages are evident. The British fleet dominates the river, and British land forces control Isle of Orleans as well as the shore directly opposite Quebec. At “The Landing Place” (to the left on the Quebec side), Wolfe’s soldiers climbed the heights to a position behind the French during the night of September 12–13, thus forcing Montcalm to leave the city and do battle on the Plains of Abraham. Titles of two inset maps: ""Part of the Upper River of St. Laurence"" and ""A View of the Action Gained by the English Sepr. 13, 1759 near Quebec.", See WKM-J-242. Minor differences exist throughout the two maps with this one being slightly more elaborate, but the most prominent differences are WKM-J-281's changing of the positions of the explanatory legend with the cartouche framing the map's title and description, and a scale that is ~25% larger due to having larger dimensions. The scale bar is in English miles, and there is no graticule; the scale was calculated from the scale bar, and the coordinates were obtained via georeferencing.
An Exact MAP of the CRIM, (Formerly TAURICA CHERSONESUS) Part of Lesser Tartary, the Sea of ASOPH, and the adjacent Country of the Kuban Tartars;
An Exact MAP of the CRIM, (Formerly TAURICA CHERSONESUS) Part of Lesser Tartary, the Sea of ASOPH, and the adjacent Country of the Kuban Tartars;
Map of the Crimean peninsula and areas surrounding the Black Sea coast and the Sea of Azov. Accompanying text: "Explanations of the map, as published by the Academy at Petersburgh from the chart sent by the Generals Lacy and Munich, in 1736 and 1737" which essentially describes the different Russian and Turkish encampments., Two scale bars on the map, one represents English Miles with the other in Russian Wersts. Prime meridian determined to be Azores meridian.
An exact PLAN of the BATTLE of MINDEN, August 1st, 1759
An exact PLAN of the BATTLE of MINDEN, August 1st, 1759
A plan of the Battle of Minden fought August 1, 1759 between the French army and the Anglo-German army during the Seven Years War. The Anglo-german alliance commanded by Field Marchal Ferdinand, Duke of Brunswick, defeated a French army commanded by Marshal of France Louis, Marquis de Contades. This plan predates the completion of this stretch of the Mittland Canal by 156 years, which is extremely prominent in the area's modern topography and has altered the landscape. The letters & numbers are explained on page 144 & 145 of the magazine., The scale and coordinates were loosely calculated via georeferencing. Unable to locate the present day equivalent of the many of the villages. Impossible to accurately georeference as drawing is not to scale (Hille at E is over 13 km away from Minden, making this a map at around 1:185,000 if it were - at this scale it would be impossible to see any details; instead a very loose scale was calculated using a smaller area around Old Minden).
Authentic Plan of the RIVER ST. LAURENCE, from Sillery to the Fall of Montmerenci, with the Operations of the SIEGE of QUEBEC, under the Command of Vice-Adm'l Saunders & Maj'r Gen'l Wolfe down to the 5 Sep'r 1759, Drawn by a Captain in His Majesties Navy
Authentic Plan of the RIVER ST. LAURENCE, from Sillery to the Fall of Montmerenci, with the Operations of the SIEGE of QUEBEC, under the Command of Vice-Adm'l Saunders & Maj'r Gen'l Wolfe down to the 5 Sep'r 1759, Drawn by a Captain in His Majesties Navy
A plan of the Siege of Quebec by Admirals Saunder and Wolfe showing troop/fleet movements, encampments and fortifications, batteries, marine navigational hazards, bridgeheads, wind direction, and buoys placed by the Wolfe's ship to combat French fireships. Drawn by an officer of the Royal Navy, this map depicts the British and French tactical positions at the time of the climatic battle on the Plains of Abraham, September 13, 1759. That engagement led to a French defeat and the deaths of both commanders, Montcalm and Wolfe; the city surrendered five days later. Wolfe’s overwhelming advantages are evident. The British fleet dominates the river, and British land forces control Isle of Orleans as well as the shore directly opposite Quebec. At “The Landing Place” (to the left on the Quebec side), Wolfe’s soldiers climbed the heights to a position behind the French during the night of September 12–13, thus forcing Montcalm to leave the city and do battle on the Plains of Abraham. Descriptions of military actions and engagements are spread throughout the map. There is a legend in the bottom left corner concerning the French defenses in the area. The inset map displays the area at a smaller scale, and plan B shows the action of the pivotal battle. Detailed descriptions of the conflict are written in the accompanying pages 279-281., The scale bar is in English miles, and there is no graticule present on the map; the scale was calculated from the scalebar and the coordinates were obtained from georeferencing.
BAYE STE. ANNE ou LE PORT DAUPHIN dans l'Isle Royale
BAYE STE. ANNE ou LE PORT DAUPHIN dans l'Isle Royale
Includes a legend of notable locations and buildings. Prominent on the map is a label for Isle de Verderonne or Isle d'Orleans which became Boularderie Island., Outside the neat lines upper right: Tome I, No. 25. Bottom center, outside the neat lines is a reference to also see "Carte de l'Isle Royale No. 22". Scale in common leagues (1 common league = 4,452 meters).
BIRD'S EYE VIEW of ANNAPOLIS ROYAL & GRANVILLE, NOVA SCOTIA, 1878
BIRD'S EYE VIEW of ANNAPOLIS ROYAL & GRANVILLE, NOVA SCOTIA, 1878
While T. M. Fowler is well known for his panoramic or maps views of Pennsylvania and north eastern United States cities and towns, producing over 400 of them, he only did a handful of Canadian views, 3 of which were Nova Scotian.
BRITISH AMERICA, Comprehending CANADA, LABRADOR, NEW-Foundland, NOVA SCOTIA &c:
BRITISH AMERICA, Comprehending CANADA, LABRADOR, NEW-Foundland, NOVA SCOTIA &c:
The map includes named aboriginal areas., London is the prime meridian.
BRITISH POSSESSIONS IN NORTH AMERICA, WITH PART OF THE UNITED STATES, COMPILED FROM OFFICIAL SOURCES
BRITISH POSSESSIONS IN NORTH AMERICA, WITH PART OF THE UNITED STATES, COMPILED FROM OFFICIAL SOURCES
Shows boundary lines as claimed by both the British and Americans. Where there were differences another boundary line is shown referring to: "Decision of the King of Holland as arbitrator"., Three inset maps: Plan of the city and harbour of Montreal; Plan of the city and Harbour of Quebec; Newfoundland. Scale is not indicated on the insets. Scale for the main map is in English Miles.
Blanmont au Pays de vauge en Loreyne
Blanmont au Pays de vauge en Loreyne
This map view of Blanmont appears in part 2 of Braun & Hogenburg's "Civitates Orbis Terrarum" (Atlas of Cities of the World). The Civates was the second oldest printed atlas., Given the age and nature of the map and the changes in Blâmont since it was done, the only geospatial information we have included is the coordinate point location of Blâmont; scale and complete bounding coordinates were impossible to determine.
British Possessions in North America
British Possessions in North America
As is typical of Arrowsmith maps, there are numerous observations noted on the map., Bottom center outside the neat line: "Drawn under the direction of Mr. Arrowsmith, and Published as the act directs June 1, 1809, by Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, Paternoster Row" and bottom right: "Drawn and Engraved by J. Russell".
British Possessions in North America from the best authorities by Samuel Lewis
British Possessions in North America from the best authorities by Samuel Lewis
Includes large inset map of Hudson's and Baffin's Bays., While this map was published in 2 different atlases, comparing our copy with both copies available on the David Rumsey web site, it is evident our copy of from Carey's copy of Guthrie rather than Carey's General Atlas. This map uses two prime meridians; one is in Philadelphia, and the other is in London.
CANADA, NEW BRUNSWICK AND NOVA SCOTIA
CANADA, NEW BRUNSWICK AND NOVA SCOTIA
Hall was one of the most active engravers during the mid-1800's and produced many attractive atlases., Scale bar: English Miles 69 to a degree. There is a colored distinction between United States / Upper Canada / Lower Canada / New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Cape Breton Island, Magdalen Islands / Newfoundland, Labrador. It also shows counties in NS, NB, Upper Canada, and Lower Canada.

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