NSCC W. K. Morrison Special Collection

This Collection was donated to NSCC COGS by Walter Morrison, Cartographer Emeritus of COGS who was interested in antique maps as an illustration of the evolution of map making technology. It is a mixed media print collection of historical maps, atlases, periodicals and books that is focused on the early mapping of Atlantic Canada and specifically Nova Scotia. There are over 2000 items in the print collection; we invite you to follow us as we grow our digital collection.


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PLAN of the CITY of HALIFAX NOVA SCOTIA
PLAN of the CITY of HALIFAX NOVA SCOTIA
Includes an index of significant buildings and locations in the city., The date of publication was estimated by Walter, presumably by researching the development of the city. It is in agreement with the record at the Nova Scotia Archives Library. Walter describes this map as rare.
PLAN of the Canals, now making from the several Coal Mines in the neighbourhood of STOURBRIDGE and DUDLEY, to the Great Canal from the Trent to the Severn near Stourton, in the County of STAFFORD, Survey'd in 1775, by Robert Whitworth
PLAN of the Canals, now making from the several Coal Mines in the neighbourhood of STOURBRIDGE and DUDLEY, to the Great Canal from the Trent to the Severn near Stourton, in the County of STAFFORD, Survey'd in 1775, by Robert Whitworth
A canal plan between Stouton and Dudley in the West Midlands, England by Robert Whitworth that appears to have been completed. A chart in the bottom left describes the details of the locks. More land features are shown than many other maps of this type with local roads, banks, brooks, coppices, churches, Seats, and towns drawn or annotated. This survey is quite accurate for its time. The obverse and reverse of a coin or medallion of the Emperor Maximin that belongs to the passage following the description of the canal is located on the bottom left. Roger Sc at lower right., The scale was calculated from the map's scale bar, and the coordinates were derived via georeferencing.
PLAN of the City of HAVANAH
PLAN of the City of HAVANAH
Includes a legend below the map indicating significant locations along with a short description., Prime Meridian is unknown due to lack of Graticule and information on the map. There is a scale bar on the bottom of the map in English Miles.
PLAN of the HARBOUR of OMOA, By Capt. J. S. Speer, Lat'de 15°. 50'. N. Long. 89. 50. W. [on sheet with] PLAN of the Fortification now erecting at OMOA
PLAN of the HARBOUR of OMOA, By Capt. J. S. Speer, Lat'de 15°. 50'. N. Long. 89. 50. W. [on sheet with] PLAN of the Fortification now erecting at OMOA
A British map of Spanish controlled Omoa Harbour and of the construction of Fortaleza de San Fernando de Omoa, located on the northern coast of present day Honduras and made a short time before the Battle of San Fernando de Omoa., Scale bar in fathoms (distance, assumed 1.7 m) for Map 1 and toise (assumed 1.949 m) in Map 2. Longitude written on the map when converted to decimal degrees is approximately 1.79° West of WGS coordinates, matching with no known prime meridians. Coordinates derived from georeferenced image.
PLAN of the NAVIGABLE CANAL now making from the River Trent to Langley Bridge, in the Counties of DERBY and NOTTINGHAM; Survey'd in 1776, by T. Smith
PLAN of the NAVIGABLE CANAL now making from the River Trent to Langley Bridge, in the Counties of DERBY and NOTTINGHAM; Survey'd in 1776, by T. Smith
A canal plan between a bridge at the Derbyshire-Nottinghamshire border North along the River Erewash until the bridge at Langley Mill. Specifications for the canal locks can be found in the bottom right corner of the map; unlike many other maps of this form, locks and cuts do not appear to be shown on the map proper, unless of course they were unnecessary., This map requires rubbersheeting for it to be anywhere close to the real world river features. The scale was calculated from the map's scale bar, and the coordinates were derived via georeferencing.
PLAN of the NEW TOWN of HALIFAX in NOVA SCOTIA
PLAN of the NEW TOWN of HALIFAX in NOVA SCOTIA
This plan of Halifax, published just 4 months after its founding, allows you to see what was planned for the city. Those familiar with the city can readily see the differences in the plan versus the reality. It is interesting that it shows none of the surrounding wilderness.
PLAN of the Navigable Canal from the Town of STROUD to the River Severn at Framiload, in the County of GLOCESTER, Survey'd in 1775
PLAN of the Navigable Canal from the Town of STROUD to the River Severn at Framiload, in the County of GLOCESTER, Survey'd in 1775
A canal map spanning from Stroud to modern day Upper Framilode and the River Severn in Gloucestershire. The map is quite sparse, and no legend is used - instead a brief description of the proposed water system details figures below the centre of the map., The map is reasonably accurate compared to WGS84. The scale was calculated from the map's scale bar, and the coordinates were derived via georeferencing.
PLAN of the RIVER SALWARP, and of the NAVIGABLE CANAL, from DROITWICH, to the RIVER SEVERN, in the COUNTY of WORCESTER
PLAN of the RIVER SALWARP, and of the NAVIGABLE CANAL, from DROITWICH, to the RIVER SEVERN, in the COUNTY of WORCESTER
This plan presents a very decorative cartouche. Following the Croitwich Barge Canal Act of 1768, the Croitwich was linked to the River Severn, Janes Brindley's contour canal opened enabling economical carriage of salt products from the brine sources of Droitwich to wider markets., A plan of the canal from modern day Droitwich Spa southwest to the River Severn. The map is oriented with SSE at the top with a one mile scale bar divided into 8 furlongs. Trees are drawn to show wooded areas, and the cartouche border has the same motif. The map's scale was calculated from its scale bar, and the coordinates were derived via georeferecing. A good candidate for rubber sheeting as it does not match well within a GIS.
PLAN of the RIVER THAMES; and of the intended NAVIGABLE CANAL, from READING, to Monkey Island. Survey'd, in 1770, and 1771
PLAN of the RIVER THAMES; and of the intended NAVIGABLE CANAL, from READING, to Monkey Island. Survey'd, in 1770, and 1771
The water route from Lancashire & Yorkshire to the East Coast. A plan of the River Thames west of London from Reading to Monkey Island near Bray, and of an intended canal to aid riparian traffic. There is little in the way of ornament; only the requisite information is present save for a few individual trees to represent wooded areas., Both the lengths of lines (miles, furlongs, and chains) and their water levels are tabled in the bottom right (feet and inches). The scale was calculated from the scale bar, and the coordinates were derived via georeferencing. This plan is reasonably accurate within a GIS.
PLAN of the Redoubt and Intrenchment on the Heights of Charles-Town (commonly called Bunker's Hill), opposite Boston, in New-England, attacked and carried by his Majesty's Troops, June 17, 1775
PLAN of the Redoubt and Intrenchment on the Heights of Charles-Town (commonly called Bunker's Hill), opposite Boston, in New-England, attacked and carried by his Majesty's Troops, June 17, 1775
An English plan of the American's entrenchments of Breed's Hill at the Battle of Bunker Hill during the Revolutionary War. The plan is a woodcut. Text below the plan in the volume describes placement of trees at angles and details placement of troops at flanks and parapets. The text includes additional new on the American Revolution including: a letter intercepted by the British from Johan Adams to Abigail Adams showing his frustration with Congress, British letters published from George Washington to General Gage, signed petitions, and other intercepted letters., Coordinates derived via georeferencing in a loose approximation; the scale was calculated from the map's scale bar.
PLAN of the River LAGON, and of the intended NAVIGABLE CANAL from BELFAST to LOUGHNEAGH, Survey'd by Order of the Rt. Hon'ble and Hon'ble the Navigation Board of Ireland in 1768, By Rob't Whitworth, Engin'r
PLAN of the River LAGON, and of the intended NAVIGABLE CANAL from BELFAST to LOUGHNEAGH, Survey'd by Order of the Rt. Hon'ble and Hon'ble the Navigation Board of Ireland in 1768, By Rob't Whitworth, Engin'r
Map of proposed navigational canals from Belfast, Ireland to Lough Neagh branching off from the River Lagan. Though simple in appearance, plan notes many villages and towns, bridges, buildings, and rivers. Table of Irish distances including chains at bottom of plan., It is oriented with NNW at the top. Scale derived from map, coordinated derived via georeferencing.
PLAN of the SIEGE of the HAVANA, Drawn by an OFFICER on the Spot 1762
PLAN of the SIEGE of the HAVANA, Drawn by an OFFICER on the Spot 1762
Plan indicates besieged camps, General Elliots Camp, Col. Hows Camp, The Governor's Fort in Havana. Plan is distinguished by positional etchings of 20 warships in the Bay of Havana and at least 108 warships moored along the coast. Numbers indicate depth soundings., Map of Havana Harbour, Cuba. Prime Meridian is unknown due to lack of information and graticule. The map reads with North facing to the bottom right corner. There is no scale bar on the map, scale was determined by measuring from the tip of Morro to the northern tip of Havana.
PLAN of the SOLWAY MOSS, Decribed in the Gent. Mag. for June, p.265
PLAN of the SOLWAY MOSS, Decribed in the Gent. Mag. for June, p.265
A large scale plan drawn by eye of the Solway Moss including a raised bog near Longtown, Cumbria, England made to accompany the author's description of its 'eruption' that occurred in 1771. Compare with WKM-J-212 along with the more detailed colour drawings done by John Ainslie in 1772. Map etchings include the Gratney House in bottom left corner, several small houses and one large tree central in the Moss. There is descriptive text on pages 265-66 of the magazine from John Walker of Moffat.
PLAN of the TOWN and FORTIFICATIONS of HAVRE DE GRACE
PLAN of the TOWN and FORTIFICATIONS of HAVRE DE GRACE
A plan of the town of present day Le Havre, France. An 8 point compass rose helps marine navigation at the mouth of the harbour. Important buildings and facilities of France's 2nd most important port are described in the legend. Sandy beaches and other terrains are symbolized using differing patterns. accompanying text begins on page 30., Extensive changes to the port over time have made georeferencing difficult; the plan does not have a graticule, thus the coordinates are obtained via loose georeferencing. Difficult to reconcile RF derived from scale bar (1 fathom = 6 feet) against real-world features for geo-referencing.

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